TokyoGirls'Update

Japanese Become Dozing Dreamers During Their Daily Train Commutes

Japanese Become Dozing Dreamers During Their Daily Train Commutes

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It may come as no surprise if you’ve ever been to Japan, but Japanese people often sleep on the train. It doesn’t just happen during the morning rush hour, either. It happens on the way home from work, commuting from one place to another in the afternoon, and even on days off… It seems natural to Japanese (even I sleep on the train while standing!), but to foreigners it’s a rare sight. You can see a video of it that has been uploaded here!

DREAMER – NIPPON INEMURI SONG

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This video was created as a promotional advertisement for the real estate information web site HOME’S. Keeping in mind “being tired from commuting on top of being tired from work” and the daily ritual those going back and forth between home and the office experience, HOME’s boasts being number one when it comes to having the largest database of property listings, and therefore is able to help in “finding the best accommodation for you”. Here they’ve strived to make a must-see video that all Japanese who suffer from commuting exhaustion can relate to.

The video features people (dreamers) dozing while on the train set to the music “Waon” by Yuusuke Emoto, and is produced by Kairi Manabe, a noteworthy commercial planner. People will find themselves humming the lyrics and melody of the song, such as the part “Sasatto Kusushita Nugitai yo~”. It shows the image of those dozing on the train (dreamers) as they hold onto their dreams (desires) while dreaming. It’s a short music film that splices together different daily commuting scenes. However, these kinds of scenes might also seem crazy to those around the world. It seems that Japanese might be the only ones in the world who doze on trains… As an aside, it also features statistics such as “those with a longer commuting time tend to be less happy” and the like. It ends with the eye-opening message that “commuting time is not money”…!

The filming took two days and included scenes of over 50 people dozing on trains throughout Tokyo. “inemuri”, or “snoozing”, is now a part of the English, German, and Russian languages, and German cultural anthropologists are now publishing a book with an investigative look at the cultural effects of “snoozing”, so it seems this unique Japanese cultural phenomenon will soon attract worldwide attention… or at least this is what people are saying in Japan. Is it true!? (laugh)

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Translated by Jamie Koide

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TokyoGirls'Update
TokyoGirls'Update

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